Name: Digimon Story: Cyber Sleuth Hacker’s Memory
Developer: Media Vision
Publisher: Bandai Namco
Released: 19, January 2018
Platforms: PlayStation 4, PS Vita
Reviewed on: PlayStation 4
Acquired: * A copy of this game was provided from publisher for review purpose*

I got the chance to relive a small part of my childhood again, or so I hoped for. Pokémon and Digimon was as I might say it, a big thing for me (approx 20 years ago and so, and still is!) Did Media Vision provide an excellent journey for me in Digimon Story: Cyber Sleuth Hacker’s Memory?

Story

Hacker’s Memory is set in the same futuristic version of Shibuya seen in Cyber Sleuth. During this period there is a virtual server called Eden, where users can enter physically, and it is in here you encounter the digital creatures called Digimons.

Our hero got his account hacked and stolen during an attack, and being accused of different sets of crimes he didn’t commit. He decides to go in to Eden in the search of this hacker.

During our journey inside (and outside) Eden we will encounter a few characters, most of the characters felt like a huge animated Japanese commercial but that aside, some of the characters is enjoyable and “well-matched” cast.  I struggled a bit to keep track on the story, as the performance felt pushed and monotonically. There was a few remarkable qualitative peaks to enjoy, perhaps even more than the original Cyber Sleuth.

5 / 10

Graphics

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The graphics isn’t the most impressive in Hacker’s Memory. Most of the level design and overall visuals feels like a PS Vita only title and not meant to be played on the PlayStation 4. This might be one of the consequences of the stagnant for many years (since the PlayStation 3 era) with a medium budget to develop the game. With as many years as this generation of consoles has been on the market, the lack of evolution in these aspects of the traditional Japanese role-playing games is no longer an excuse, which gives the feeling that you are always playing the same thing, although with the system combat a bit varied between deliveries or titles.

But this was something that the developers had been clear about regarding the recycle content. And I did like the design of the subway when free roaming in the real world.

6 / 10

Gameplay

I quickly learned that this type of game isn’t something for me. As I’m pretty much impatient with things, and Hacker’s Memory truly puts this to an test. Long cutscenes (pretty much normal though in Japanese video games, those are fine as long as they are interesting) which was fine, but the way they told the story got boring as most the story was told through speak bobles and there was a lot of speak bobles. As mentioned in Graphics, the combat system is a bit varied between deliveries and titles, and one of the main novelties of these random battles with system of turns are the battle of hackers; that by means of three characters on each side will fight in a duel on a board game where the objective is to occupy the maximum positions to obtain higher score. And when two characters collide in the same position it will lead to a one-armed battle turn, where this encounter ended, each one will continue counting on the same life that ended the confrontation.

One of the highlights in Hacker’s Memory is the interaction with our digital pets, being able to be more open inside the system DigiLab that allows us to find many options of evolution, attributes and so on. But overall I think Digimon Story: Cyber Sleuth Hacker’s Memory gameplay part fits more to people who enjoy these types of games more than casual “fangirls” of the series.

6 / 10

Controls

The controls was easy to learn, pretty much one button smash to proceed the text and a few movements on the joystick to move around or using the interface inside battle’s for instance.

8 / 10

Replay Value

I can’t say that the replay value is present by playing the story once more, but then again there are over 300 different Digimons to catch.

6 /10

Verdict

Digimon Story: Cyber Sleuth Hacker’s Memory might dazzle a few fans of Digimon and the first Cyber Sleuth game. Although it sins to be excessively continustia with respect to the original and something simple as far as the JRPG mechanics are concerned.

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Pros

  • Tons of Digimon to collect
  • DigiLab / Evolution
  • A few well acted characters
Cons

  • Too much “recycle”
  • Few steps forward regarding the technically have been made.

Story: 5/10
Graphics: 6/10
Gameplay: 6/10
Controls: 8/10
Replay Value: 6/10

Total Score: 6/10

You can check out our review policy right here, if you wonder how we set our scores.

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